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12 posts from November 2014

"Deportation relief is a stopgap measure," says David Bacon, author of THE RIGHT TO STAY HOME: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration. "We need permanent solutions so that those receiving deferred status are not vulnerable." Read more →


When Daisy Hernández thinks about Stone Butch Blues, Leslie Feinberg's classic novel of the transgender experience, she thinks of a conference room in Manhattan and a young trans man she was in love with. Read more →


The UUA and other religious organizations have reignited the Sanctuary Movement, an interfaith campaign that encourages congregations to open their doors and offer sanctuary to immigrants facing deportation... Read more →


Between 2009 and 2011, journalist Philip Winslow offered us a half dozen of his insightful “Observation Posts,” pieces which opened our eyes to international issues with original reporting. We’re delighted to welcome him back with this remarkable remembrance of one of the most significant events of the past decades: the fall of the Berlin Wall. Read more →


Since nothing beats getting cozy and having some quality time with a new paperback, we put together a list of seven recent releases that you can lose yourself in as the weather turns cold. Read more →


Louise Steinman, author of THE CROOKED MIRROR: A Memoir of Polish-Jewish Reconciliation, reflects on the opening of Warsaw's POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews and the evolving nature of Jewish remembrance in Poland. Read more →


In an excerpt adapted from their 2012 book, Billionaires’ Ball: Gluttony and Hubris in an Age of Epic Inequality, Linda McQuaig and Neil Brooks explore the real origins of the Tea Party’s “grassroots” movement, and the secret world of the Koch brothers’ conservative money machine fueling America’s escalating inequality. Read more →