155 posts categorized "Public Health, Medicine, and Science" Feed

“Could anything actually exist in the scientific universe that is worthy of being called God?” Nancy Ellen Abram's answer is yes: there’s a way to think about God that takes away none of its power but all of its impossibilities, based on the new science of “emergence.” Read more →

Dr. H. Gilbert Welch is an academic physician, a professor at Dartmouth Medical School, and a nationally recognized expert on the effects of medical testing. He sees the value of medical care, particularly in those who are acutely ill or injured. But in many other settings, we have exaggerated the benefits of medical care and understated its harms. In this video, Dr. Welch examines some widely held assumptions about the value of medical care. Read more →

Caitlin Meyer, senior publicist at Beacon Press, has some book recommendations (and a recipe!) just in time for Chanukah. Read more →

As we step into the new school year, parents and teachers need a hearty reminder that all the quirky, alarming, troubling, and troublesome behaviors manifested by children, though concerning, are not evidence of a mental disorder. Read more →

As Father’s Day approaches, we’ve been thinking of books we’d recommend to our own fathers. Here are five titles that share a deep interest in the world, or that tell the story of fatherhood itself, with all its memories and complexities and sometime revelations. If your father is anything like ours, we're sure he would take any of these books, find a quiet place to sit, and then read every word. Read more →

Women’s History Month Classics: In the thirty-five years since its publication, Toward a New Psychology of Women by Jean Baker Miller, MD, has become famous for its groundbreaking demonstration of how sexual stereotypes restrict men’s and women’s psychological development. Wendy... Read more →

On the anniversary of a landmark ruling giving women the right to control their reproductive destiny, Carole Joffe reflects on where we stand today. Read more →

A roundup of suggestions for your new (or old) e-book reader. Read more →